Last edited by Kajirg
Wednesday, October 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Floating population and migration in China found in the catalog.

Floating population and migration in China

Floating population and migration in China

the impact of economic reforms

  • 222 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Institut für Asienkunde in Hamburg .
Written in English

    Places:
  • China
    • Subjects:
    • Migration, Internal -- China -- Congresses.,
    • Rural-urban migration -- China -- Congresses.,
    • China -- Economic policy -- 1976-2000 -- Congresses.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementThomas Scharping (ed.).
      GenreCongresses.
      SeriesMitteilungen des Instituts für Asienkunde Hamburg ;, Nr. 284
      ContributionsScharping, Thomas.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDS1 .I55 nr. 28, HB2114.A3 .I55 nr. 28
      The Physical Object
      Pagination376 p. :
      Number of Pages376
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL424218M
      ISBN 103889101909
      LC Control Number98129719

      The floating population, frequently moving between jobs and cities, was seen as a major challenge to policy implementation and increasingly scrutinised. In an article published in the Beijing Review, one anonymous reporter noted: One of the difficulties is controlling the birth rate among China's increasingly large floating population. Zhu, Yu “The Floating Population's Household Strategies and the Role of Migration in China's Regional Development and Integration,” International Journal of Population Geography, 9(6): –

      This paper aims to contribute to the theorisation of the expectations for the future life (EFL) of floating people whose household registration books (hukou) are not registered locally in China’s mega-cities. Although the EFL of many rural-urban migrants is explicit, the EFL type of other floating cohorts such as educated migrants and the formation mechanism of EFL of floating people are. Migration Trends: Floating Population, (Estimates in Millions) 0 20 40 60 80 Rural-Urban Migration in China Author: Chan.

      Get this from a library! Migration in China's Guangdong province: major results of a sample survey on migrants and floating population in Shenzhen and Foshan. [Thomas Scharping;]. Masculine Compromise, written by two sociologists, Susanne Y.P. Choi and Yinni Peng, is a feminist examination of how this migration has changed gender dynamics in contemporary China, with a focus on the lives, subjectivities, and emotions of male migrants. Based on numerous interviews conducted by the authors and their research team between.


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Floating population and migration in China Download PDF EPUB FB2

Papers from an international conference on migration and floating population in China organised by Modern China-Studies at Cologne University, l Germany, in May Description: pages: illustrations, maps ; 21 cm.

affect future trends in migration and the floating population. Introduction Migration in China has attracted increasing attention from researchers and policy-makers, and for good reason.

Since major market reforms began in the late s, China's population has become ever more mobile. From a demographic perspective, the.

Despite the economic growth in China, the working conditions both the residents and immigrants have significantly deteriorated.

The article called China’s Floating Population provides an extensive and detailed analysis of the consequences of the country’s economic reformation with regard to the historical pre-conditions, current problems, and future perspectives for development 1.

Along the way, we review some key empirical findings on China's floating population. We also discuss factors that have affected recent trends and are likely to affect future trends in migration and the floating population. Beijing Statistical Bureau Cited by: The rise of China's floating population has, in general, been deemed as a response to the gradually relaxed government control over rural-urban migration and the widening rural-urban and regional.

China's floating population is one of the most mobile populations in the world. Most of its members take the temporary form of migration, and maintain their double (rural and urban) residential status. Using data from the and Chinese population censuses and applying a consistent definition of migration, we examine changing patterns of China's floating population during – During the first decade of the twenty‐first century, there have been significant changes in China's floating population, as reflected in a continuing growth of interprovincial floating population.

Internal migration in the People's Republic of China is one of the most extensive in the world according to the International Labour Organization. This is because migrants in China are commonly members of a floating population, which refers primarily to migrants in China without local household registration status through the Chinese Hukou system.

In general, rural-urban migrant workers are. At present, the number of large cities (with a population of over 1 million) has increased from 13 to 56 (Wu, Zhang and Shen ).

The rapid rate of China's urban growth is fuelled by rural migrants' movement to cities, the largest such movement in history within a compressed period of time. PDF | As one of the most conspicuous consequences of the household registration (hukou) system, China's so-called 'floating migration' has attracted a | Find, read and cite all the research you.

With rapid commercialization, a booming urban economy, and the relaxation of state migration policies, over million peasants, known as China’s “floating population,” have streamed into large cities seeking employment and a better life.

This massive flow of rural migrants directly challenges Chinese socialist modes of state s: 2. Migration, Identity and Wellbeing in China: Recent Developments and New Research Fei Guo and Robyn R.

Iredale Part I TRENDS IN INTERNAL MIGRATION 2. Five Decades of the Chinese Hukou System Kam Wing Chan 3. Changing Spatial and Temporal Patterns of China’s Floating Population: Findings from the and Censuses (). Floating Population and Internal Migration in China: Sun Changmin. International Migration Patterns: Ye Wenzhen.

Ethnic Population: Du Peng. Population and Environment in China: Dai Xingyi. Population of China: Prospects and Challenges: Zhai Zhenwu.

The Distribution of China's Population and Its Changes: Wang Guixin. The past two decades have seen exponential growth of urbanisation and migration in China. Emerging from this growth is a population of floating and left-behind. Floating population dominate the population migration in China, and their residence time longer than six months allows for changes of lifestyle and poses tangible influences on associated air-pollutant emissions.

Relevant data for floating population is obtained from the Chinese Census (the. With rapid commercialization, a booming urban economy, and the relaxation of state migration policies, over million peasants, known as China’s “floating population,” have streamed into large cities seeking employment and a better life.

This massive flow of rural migrants directly challenges Chinese socialist modes of state control/5(2). Migration, Identity and Wellbeing in China: Recent Developments and New Research Fei Guo and Robyn R. Iredale PART I TRENDS IN INTERNAL MIGRATION 2.

Five Decades of the Chinese Hukou System Kam Wing Chan 3. Changing Spatial and Temporal Patterns of China’s Floating Population: Findings from the and Censuses Yu Zhu, Baoyu Xiao and.

Mobility increases and economic restructuring since the s, however, call for new conceptualizations of migration. Using interprovincial migration data from China's and censuses, I analyze migration rates, migration effectiveness, population growth, net migration flows, and spatial focusing of migration.

With rapid commercialization, a booming urban economy, and the relaxation of state migration policies, over million peasants, known as China s "floating population, have streamed into large cities seeking employment and a better life.

This massive flow of rural migrants directly challenges Chinese socialist modes of state control. This comprehensive volume analyses Chinese birth policies and population developments from the founding of the People's Republic to the census. The main emphasis is on China's 'Hardship Number One Under Heaven': the highly controversial one-child campaign, and the violent clash between family strategies and government policies it Control in China documents an.

Thomas Scharping is Chair for Modern Chinese Studies at the University of Cologne, Germany. He has published widely on modern China, including Floating Population and Migration in China: The Impact of Economic Reforms (Hamburg: ) and the documentary collection The Evolution of Regional Birth Planning Norms in China (for the Journal Chinese Sociology and Anthropology.the emergence of the floating population in China.

We argue that the neoclassical model alone is not adequate to explain the massive rural-urban internal migration underway in China. Instead, ideas drawn from both sociological theories of segmented markets and institutional economics are used to supplement the standard neoclassical explanation.the floating population has reached million1 China uses a two-track migration tracking system which includes both permanent migration and temporary migration (Chan, ; Gu, ; Sun & Fan, ).

The concepts of permanent migration and temporary migration are rooted in the Chinese institution of household registration, known as ‘hukou.’.